A PARENT'S GUIDE TO THIRD GRADERS

  

  • How They Grow in Third Grade 
    • Where They Are
      The average eight-year-old is explosive, excitable, dramatic, and inquisitive. She:
      • Possesses a "know-it-all" attitude.
      • Is able to assume some responsibility for her actions.
      • Actively seeks praise.
      • May undertake more than she can handle successfully.
      • Is self-critical.
      • Recognizes the needs of others.
    • Where They're Going
      At eight years old, your child is learning how to set goals and understand the consequences of his behavior. You can help by encouraging him as he:
      • Explores the relationships of feelings, goals, and behavior.
      • Learns about choices and consequences.
      • Begins setting goals.
      • Becomes more responsible.
      • Learns how to work with others.
  • Your Child's Communication: y the end of third grade your child should be able to do the following:
    • Listening
      • Listen attentively in group situations
      • Understand grade-level material
    • Speaking
      • Speak clearly with an appropriate voice
      • Ask and respond to questions
      • Participate in conversations and group discussions
      • Use subject-related vocabulary
      • Stay on topic, use appropriate eye contact, and take turns in conversation
      • Summarize a story accurately
      • Explain what has been learned
    • Reading
      • Demonstrate full mastery of basic phonics
      • Use word analysis skills when reading
      • Use clues from language content and structure to help understand what is read
      • Predict and justify what will happen next in stories and compare and contrast stories
      • Ask and answer questions regarding reading material
      • Use acquired information to learn about new topics
      • Read grade-level books fluently (fiction and nonfiction)
      • Reread and correct errors when necessary
    • Writing
      • Plan, organize, revise, and edit
      • Include details in writing
      • Write stories, letters, simple explanations, and brief reports
      • Spell simple words correctly, correct most spelling independently, and use a dictionary to correct spelling
      • Write clearly in cursive
  • Parenting and Behavioral
    • Tell your child every day that you love him or her.
    • Always find words of praise that encourage schoolwork and friendship. Use more encouraging than discouraging words when speaking to your child. He or she needs to feel valued in the family and with friends.
    • Provide personal space for your child at home, even if it's limited.
    • Encourage your child to talk with you about school, friends or feelings. Answer his or her questions.
    • Spend individual time with your child, doing something you both enjoy.
    • Enhance your child's experiences through family trips.
    • Help your child develop an ability to deal constructively with conflict and anger in the family, at school and in the neighborhood.
    • Find good friends for your child. Promote interaction and allegiance with peers through participation in social activities, community groups and team sports. Help your child learn how to get along with his or her peers. Talk to your child about the enjoyable and difficult aspects of friendships.
    • While parents should establish fair rules with respect to chores, TV watching, outside activities, homework, bedtime, etc., the number of rules should be kept to a minimum. The role of peers in the life of an 8-year-old increases, and children may resist adult authority at times.
    • The TV can become a major pastime for the 8-year-old. Don't let it. Television can be a positive resource if watched in small and controlled doses. Always watch TV with your child and explain the differences between reality and fantasy.
    • Ensure that an adult is present with your child (or make another appropriate arrangement) when you are not at home.
    • Spend active time with your child on a daily basis, if possible. Especially show interest in your child's daily school activities.
    • Understand the importance of serving as a parental role model.
    • Praise and encourage your child's activities. Build his or her self-esteem. Show affection. If there are siblings, promote the individual strengths of each child.
    • Encourage age-appropriate independence and self-responsibility.
    • Encourage reading. Read together. Your example will help reinforce that reading gives pleasure. If you haven't already done so, get a library card and use it.
  • Development
    • Able to tell time.
    • Can read for pleasure.
    • Has a sense of humor ("do you know any good jokes? What's your favorite joke?").
    • Is concerned about rules - good (fair) vs. bad (unfair).
    • Cares for herself, her room, and her belongings; can take responsibility for home chores.
    • Has more control over small muscles, and therefore writes and draws with more skill.
    • Likes to belong to informal "clubs" formed by children themselves.
    • Performs at grade level in all subjects (e.g., scores at the 40th percentile or better on school achievement tests)

 

For additional information go to http://www.education.com/grade/third-grade

 

This information is a guide to the “typical” child. Each child is unique and achieves these mile stones in their own time. If you have any concerns regarding your child’s progress, please contact the teacher for ways to help your child to work toward achieving these mile stones.