A PARENT GUIDE TO FIRST GRADE

 

A PARENT’S GUIDE TO FIRST GRADERS

  • How They Grow in First Grade
    • Where They Are
      The average six-year-old is extremely egocentric and wants to be the center of attention. She:
      • Wants to be the "best" and "first."
      • Has boundless energy.
      • May be oppositional, silly, brash, and critical.
      • Cries easily; shows a variety of tension-releasing behavior.
      • Is attached to the teacher.
      • Has difficulty being flexible.
      • Often considers fantasy real.
    • Where They're Going
      At six years old, your child is learning to understand himself. You can help by encouraging him as he:
      • Develops a positive, realistic self-concept.
      • Learns to respect himself.
      • Begins to understand his own uniqueness.
      • Gains awareness of his feelings.
      • Learns to express feelings.
      • Learns how to participate in groups.
      • Begins to learn from his mistakes.
  • Your Child's Communication

By the end of first grade your child should be able to do the following:

    • Listening
      • Remember information
      • Respond to instructions
      • Follow 2-3 step directions in a sequence
    • Speaking
      • Be easily understood
      • Answer more complex "yes/no" questions
      • Tell and retell stories and events in a logical order
      • Express ideas with a variety of complete sentences
      • Use most parts of speech (grammar) correctly
      • Ask and respond to "wh" questions (who, what, where, when, why)
      • Stay on topic and take turns in conversation
      • Give directions
      • Start conversations
    • Reading
      • Create rhyming words
      • Identify all sounds in short words
      • Blend separate sounds to form words
      • Match spoken words with print
      • Know how a book works (e.g., read from left to right and top to bottom in English)
      • Identify letters, words, and sentences
      • Sound out words when reading
      • Have a sight vocabulary of 100 common words
      • Read grade-level material fluently
      • Understand what is read
    • Writing
      • Express ideas through writing
      • Print clearly
      • Spell frequently used words correctly
      • Begin each sentence with capital letters and use ending punctuation
      • Write a variety of stories, journal entries, or letters/notes
  • Parenting and Behavioral
    • Adults play important roles in the life of children at age 6. Children will develop close relationships with teachers. It can be upsetting to a child when adults they love (including teachers) go through difficult times or changes.
    • Establish rules to be followed at home with respect to: bedtime, TV watching, helping with chores such as setting the table, keeping their room neat.
    • The TV can become a major pastime for the 6-year-old. Don't let it. Television can be a positive resource if watched in small and controlled doses. Always watch TV with your child and explain the differences between reality and fantasy.
    • Spend active time with your child on a daily basis if possible. Especially show interest in your child's daily school activities.
    • At this age, an adult should be present at home (or other arrangements made for adult supervision) when the parents are absent.
    • Praise and encourage the child's activities. Build the child's self-esteem. Show affection. If there are siblings, promote the individual strengths of each child.
    • Promote activities outside the home. Remember that the goal of these activities is to have fun and develop oneself to the greatest capacity. Winning and losing should receive limited attention.
    • Encourage reading. Read to your 6-year-old. Let him or her read to you. Read together. Your example will help reinforce that reading gives pleasure. If you haven't already done so, get a library card and use it.
  • Development
    • Can bounce a ball 4-6 times; throws and catches.
    • Skates.
    • Can ride a bicycle.
    • Can tie shoelaces.
    • Can count up to 100, print first name, print numbers up to 10 and print a few letters.
    • Knows right from left.
    • Can draw a person with six body parts.
    • Begins to learn some specific sports skills like batting a ball or kicking a soccer ball.

 

For additional information go to http://www.education.com/grade/first-grade

This infomation is a guide to the “typical” child. Each child is unique and achieves these mile stones in their own time. If you have any concerns regarding your child’s progress, please contact the teacher for ways to help your child to work toward achieving these mile stones.